sigsauer-ist:

patrikthestar:

theelpasogunfight:

panicrobot:

This man was our president for EIGHT YEARS. We are never gonna live this down

Hahahaha

i got the same SAT score as him, so i know where i stand

i’m not a tree i’m a bush

(via cthulhu-with-a-fez)

slomps:

People who can keep their cool when being told off or made fun of are not to be messed with

(via cthulhu-with-a-fez)

idinmenzel:

enjolrastheunicorn:

The casts of Wicked, Rocky Horror, Les Misérables and the King and I making musical history in Melbourne, Australia with four musicals showing at once.

I think those are the 4 most diverse shows you could put on

(via talkaboutartassholes)

szmoon:

Reblog: Why its not cool to copy.

I very rarely reblog, but this is important. I can’t stand to watch Forever 21 hurt yet another designer, let alone Knickerocker.

knickerocker:

So once again, I’m compelled to write something that I’ve actually been thinking about for a while, but was really brought to my attention last night.


At about 1am my time, my old assistant sent me an email with this photo to show me that Forever21 had stolen my designs and are selling them in their stores for £3.50 ($5-$6).

image

This really sucks on all levels and I’m actually quiet upset about it. The thing with designs, especially clothing is that its really hard, if not impossible to patent/ copywriter and further more, being a small, independent, handmade designer, I just couldn’t afford to do this anyway.

And yes, I’ve seen various underwear designers copy aspects of my animal undies - there is a company out there who are printing on American Apparel undies and have the face and ears on the front. They do have the added bonus of being friends with a bunch of alt models with large social media followings, but they did at least have their own perspective of sorts on my idea and just the other day, I saw that a shop on Etsy was selling underwear with ears but no face. Good for these two companies, this is how trends work, I get it. But Forever21, have just blatantly ripped me off rather than putting their own twist on a trend.

I am a small indie designer, and everything is handmade - last year during the holidays, my Etsy shop became incredibly busy, so much so, I was able to employ 4 other people. This was really awesome and I payed well above the min wage, even though after I did my taxes, I didn’t actually make that much money, however, I  would of just felt super crappy if I’d payed low wages or no wages. I’m pretty sure Forever21 don’t feel the same. Also, some people say that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Its not. Right now, I’m looking into having my designs ethically manufactured, I want to offer a lower price point and I’d love to do wholesale, Forever 21 stealing my designs will probably have some affect on my ability to do this.

But back to copying. I see it all the time on Etsy, just because you think you can make something cheaper than another designer, doesn’t mean you should. Who knows how many harness bra’s there are on Etsy right now. Its craziness. There is plenty of room for everyone, but have your own point of view, do something new, something different, something more. This is the key to being successful, if you have something new and awesome to say, people will listen.

Again, thank you for listening to me. I hope in someway, I can get Forever21’s attention and perhaps  they’ll remove my ripped of designs from their stores.

You can buy the originals here  - www.knickerocker.etsy.com

From now on, I am going to try my best to never shop at Forever 21 ever again. 

It was easy for me to boycott Urban Outfitters and their high prices when I found out they were ripping designs off of independent Etsy sellers. I always knew that Forever 21 did similar things, but avoided thinking about it because I’m not rich and their prices are really affordable. But now this is different. They’re blatantly ripping off the designs of my former boss, Knickerocker. This is just disgusting. I know just how hard she works at designing, sewing, packing and shipping the undies she creates. For a long time, this is what paid her mortgage. And Forever 21, with its endless resources, just simply copied her designs and is sell them off as their own.

Knickerocker Original Panda Face Panties

Forever 21 Rip-off/Stolen Panda Panties

I know it’s the nature of the fashion industry - there’s almost no way to copyright designs, and it’s virtually impossible to go after anyone who steals them. While it’s true that name/original brands and mass produced knock-offs target completely different audiences, it doesn’t mean that there is no damage done to the original brand when it’s being copied. 

In its quest to produce affordable, mass produced versions of these panties, Forever21 could have struck a deal with Knickerocker to use her designs. In this situation I feel like Forever21 would not have lost a significant amount of profit, and Knickerocker would have benefited in profit on intellectual property, as well as exposure for her work. 

Also now, if Knickerocker ever plans to have her designs manufactured herself to create a more affordable product (as is pretty common with businesses that start off as handmade), it will have already been done and spread around the market by knock-off Forever 21 versions, which will also hurt her business.

This isn’t right. So as my own way to to go up against this, I am avoiding shopping at Forever 21 from now on.

Please reblog and help spread the word ♡

(via thepacificrimjob)

mare-moment:

long-spot-to-freedom:

bunnyfood:

(via lawebloca)

The only acceptable way to do the ice bucket challenge with your horse.

The horse is like “alright u fuckin idiot here comes that cold ass water.”

"Idfk why I’m friends with u"

(via cthulhu-with-a-fez)

familyfriendlyurl:

THE ENTIRE GAGNAM STYLE VIDEO, COMPRESSED INTO A 1FPS 15x8 ANIMATED GIF IMAGEimage

(via ofgotham)

If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also
Matt 5:39

This specifically refers to a hand striking the side of a person’s face, tells quite a different story when placed in it’s proper historical context. In Jesus’s time, striking someone of a lower class ( a servant) with the back of the hand was used to assert authority and dominance. If the persecuted person “turned the other cheek,” the discipliner was faced with a dilemma. The left hand was used for unclean purposes, so a back-hand strike on the opposite cheek would not be performed. Another alternative would be a slap with the open hand as a challenge or to punch the person, but this was seen as a statement of equality. Thus, by turning the other cheek the persecuted was in effect putting an end to the behavior or if the slapping continued the person would lawfully be deemed equal and have to be released as a servant/slave.   

(via thefullnessofthefaith)

THAT makes a lot more sense, now, thank you. 

(via guardianrock)

I can attest to the original poster’s comments. A few years back I took an intensive seminar on faith-based progressive activism, and we spent an entire unit discussing how many of Jesus’ instructions and stories were performative protests designed to shed light on and ridicule the oppressions of that time period as a way to emphasize the absurdity of the social hierarchy and give people the will and motivation to make changes for a more free and equal society.

For example, the next verse (Matthew 5:40) states “And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well.” In that time period, men traditionally wore a shirt and a coat-like garment as their daily wear. To sue someone for their shirt was to put them in their place - suing was generally only performed to take care of outstanding debts, and to be sued for one’s shirt meant that the person was so destitute the only valuable thing they could repay with was their own clothing. However, many cultures at that time (including Hebrew peoples) had prohibitions bordering on taboo against public nudity, so for a sued man to surrender both his shirt and his coat was to turn the system on its head and symbolically state, in a very public forum, that “I have no money with which to repay this person, but they are so insistent on taking advantage of my poverty that I am leaving this hearing buck-ass naked. His greed is the cause of a shameful public spectacle.”

All of a sudden an action of power (suing someone for their shirt) becomes a powerful symbol of subversion and mockery, as the suing patron either accepts the coat (and therefore full responsibility as the cause of the other man’s shameful display) or desperately chases the protester around trying to return his clothes to him, making a fool of himself in front of his peers and the entire gathered community.

Additionally, the next verse (Matthew 5:41; “If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles.”) was a big middle finger to the Romans who had taken over Judea and were not seen as legitimate authority by the majority of the population there. Roman law stated that a centurion on the march could require a Jew (and possibly other civilians as well, although I don’t remember explicitly) to carry his pack at any time and for any reason for one mile along the road (and because of the importance of the Roman highway system in maintaining rule over the expansive empire, the roads tended to be very well ordered and marked), however hecould not require any service beyond the next mile marker. For a Jewish civilian to carry a centurion’s pack for an entire second mile was a way to subvert the authority of the occupying forces. If the civilian wouldn’t give the pack back at the end of the first mile, the centurion would either have to forcibly take it back or report the civilian to his commanding officer (both of which would result in discipline being taken against the soldier for breaking Roman law) or wait until the civilian volunteered to return the pack, giving the Judean native implicit power over the occupying Roman and completely subverting the power structure of the Empire. Can you imagine how demoralizing that must have been for the highly ordered Roman armies that patrolled the region?

Jesus was a pacifist, but his teachings were in no way passive. There’s a reason he was practically considered a terrorist by the reigning powers, and it wasn’t because he healed the sick and fed the hungry.

(via central-avenue)

In other words, Jesus was executed by the State because he challenged the State’s power.

(via rindle-spikes)

(via thegirlwithgoldeyes)

annakendrickofficial:

a shout out to all the people who started saying “same” as a joke once in awhile but now use it for the most random things like a car honking their horn at another car

(via ofhrry)

  • Random college kid: Dude are you a real punk or a fake punk?
  • Me: I, um. I-I don't care?
  • Kid: *turns to his friend* Dude he said he doesn't care that means he's a real punk hi I'm Doug nice to meet you

(via moriarty)